About Tom

HHO Webmaster, Cellist

2023 – 2024 Committee

Name Title
TBD Chair
Julian Fisher Concerto Competitions Coordinator
Joseph Nachman Programme Editor
Nicole Desaulnier Music Librarian, Social Director
Tom Lee Webmaster
Laura Bolt Communications Director
TBD Social Media Director
TBD Concert Posters/Promotions Director
Craig Deng Member-at-Large
Vincent Hung Member-at-Large
Rick Palidwor Clubs and Registered Programs Associate, Hart House

[ previous season ]

Musicians

LEGEND CM Concertmaster; ACM Assistant Concertmaster; P Principal; AP Assistant Principal; CP Co-Principal

Violin I

Joanna Tang (CM)
Haruna Monri (ACM)
Fei Ye
Yuchen Dai
Yuna Koh
Ayala Revah
Anika Cheung
Ben Lai
Lillian Haspel
Silvana Pesenti
Mako Kobayashi
Hans Fischer
Lilian Gien
Andrew Ogilvie
Lynn Liang
Josh Lau
Nathalie Ott Mercier
Frédéric Mercier
Joseph Nachman

Violin II

Tim Leung (P)
Trish Howells (AP)
Sophia Lee
Clarisse Schneider
Adam Taback
Kate Sohn
Kazusa Minowa
Ella MacPherson
Elizabeth Domb
Craig Deng
Kaeden Yu
Vincent Hung
Tamako Fan
Perry Wong
Ryan Fu
Nicole Desaulnier
Caroline Pai (Winter)

Viola

Julian Fisher (P)
Elliot McMurchy
Jesse Coleman
Mateo Ham
Aaron Shulman TBC
Arn Macpherson
Elizabeth Brubaker
Sooa Lim
Elizabeth Widner
Kian Ayoughi

Cello

Adam Caulfield (P)
Yuna Lee (AP)
Ilyas Syed
Chelsea Cheng
Tom Lee
Nathaniel Dickie
Alistair Grieve
Hilary Parkes
Lara Isaac
Jiayii Zhao
Tyson Caul

Double Bass

Hannah Rubia (P)
David McElroy

Flute/Piccolo

Laura Bolt (P)
Renee Willmon (AP)
Camille Beaudoin
Ayla Denenberg

Oboe

Megan Yuen (P)
Joshua Zung (AP)
Evan Herman

Clarinet

Sean Lin (P)
Anka Stephanovic
Helen Li
Joshua Zung
Danielle Waxer

Bassoon

Robert Lu (P)
Roland Wilk
Zenghao Wang
Contra Bassoon
Roland Wilk

Horn

Adam Rosenfield (P)
Alex Buck
Elli Hung
Daniel Zaltz

Trumpet

David Forsey
Brennan Schommer

Trombone

David Arnot-Johnston (P)
Chenhao Gong
Shaiyan Keshevari
Kevin He

Tuba

Steve Vettesse

Timpani

Daniel Smadja

Percussion

Phoenix Wong

[ Previous Season ]

2022 – 2023 Season

Summer Concert 2023 – May 28 – Conductor Eszter Horvath

PROKOFIEV, S. – Peter and the Wolf
STRAUSS, J. – Radetzky March
RAVEL, M. – Ma Mere L’oye

Past Concerts

Spring Concert 2023 – March 30

Concert Program
Veronika Anissimova, Soprano

STRAUSS, R. – Don Juan Op. 20
MAHLER, G. – Rückert Lieder feat. Soprano Veronica Anissimova
BARTÓK, B. – Kossuth

Spring Concert: R. Strauss Don Juan, Bartok Kossuth and Mahler Ruckert Lieder

Winter Concert 2023 – February 16

Concert Program (pdf)

PROKOFIEV, S. – Winter Bonfire Op.122
Pärt, Arvo – Wenn Bach Bienen Gezuchtet Hatte
SHOSTAKOVICH, D. – Symphony No. 5

Fall Concert 2022 – November 24

MOZART, W. A. – Serenade KV.361 “Gran Partita”
GRIFFES, Charles – Poem for Flute A.93 featuring Flautist Laura Bolt
BEETHOVEN, L. V. – Symphony No. 5 Op. 67 in C minor

Concert Program (pdf)

In Memoriam

Featured

The Orchestra dedicates the Spring Concert 2023 to the memory of its founding Music Director, Maestro William “Bill” Phillips.

Bill Phillips

Maestro Phillips passed away on February 17, 2023 at the age of 85 at his home in Plattsburgh, NY with his family by his side. A trumpeter, conductor, and composer, Bill’s contributions to musical life around Toronto, across Canada and beyond are bountiful. The HHO is fortunate to be one among them, founded under Bill’s baton almost half a century ago, and still going strong. The Orchestra continues to provide challenging and enriching opportunities for musical fellowship and performance among University of Toronto students, alumni and community members.

Rest in peace Maestro. We are eternally grateful. 

Globe & Mail: “Trumpet player Bill Phillips was a fierce advocate for the arts”

Obituary

Concert Programs

Spring 1981

Fall 1981

Laura Bolt, Flute

Laura Bolt is a freelance flautist who holds an M.Phil in musicology (University of Cambridge, UK), a B.Mus in flute performance (Queen’s University, Canada), and an ARCT (Royal Conservatory of Music). Her solo performances have included concerti with the Greater Toronto Philharmonic Orchestra, Cellovision, and the Queen’s University Symphony Orchestra. She is a former member of the Kingston Symphony Orchestra, and performs regularly in recital. British composers Nick Collins and Tristan Rhys Williams have dedicated flute compositions to her.

As a member of the Hart House Orchestra since 2012, Laura is delighted to be performing Griffes’ Poem for Flute and Orchestra as the winner of the 2019 Concerto Competition and to be receiving the K. Alan Turner Prize. In addition to her musical endeavours, Laura has a doctorate in biological anthropology and is currently a faculty member at the University of Toronto Mississauga.

Laura Bolt

2022 – 2023 Musicians

LEGEND CM Concertmaster; ACM Assistant Concertmaster; P Principal; AP Assistant Principal; CP Co-Principal

Violin 1

Joanna Tang (CM)
Haruna Monri (ACM)
Daniel Nam
Fei Ye
William Boan
Andrew Ogilvie
Ben Lai
Silvana Pesenti
Chris Klochek
Amaury Jean
Hans Fischer
Ayala Revah
Rod Gonzaga
Linjia Zhou
Joseph Nachman

Violin II

Tim Leung (P)
Trish Howells (AP)
Sophia Lee
Clifford Chuang
Craig Deng
Lilian Gien
Joshua Lau
Mihira Lakshman
Elizabeth Watts Domb
Minsheng Hung
Quinn Grundy
Behram Hathi
Lynn Liang
Nicole Desaulnier
Lucia Yu
Perry Wong

Viola

Julian Fisher (P)
Jesse Coleman
Aaron Shulman
Arn Macpherson
Elizabeth Brubaker
Kunihiro Ito
Elizabeth Widner

Cello

Lynn Wei (P)
Yuna Lee
Ilyas Syed
Helena Likwornik
Tom Lee
Nathaniel Dickie
Richard Mills
Claire Jeon
Alistair Grieve
Hilary Parkes

Bass

Hannah Rubia (P)
David McElroy
Marc Candeliere
Gloria Chang

Flute/Piccolo

Renee Willmon (CP)
Laura Bolt (CP)
Camille Beaudoin

Oboe

Joshua Zung
Kristie Ng

Clarinet

Sean Lin (P)
Graham Nasby
Carlos Vasquez
Le Lu (Basset Horn)

Bassoon/Contrabassoon

Roland Wilk (P)
Robert Lu

Horn

Adam Rosenfield (P)
Alex Buck
Joanne Yin
Matthew Graystone

Trumpet

David Forsey
Brennan Schommer

Trombone

David Arnot-Johnston (P)
Chenhao Gong

Bass Trombone

Shaiyan Keshvari

Tuba

Steve Vettese

Timpani

Jeffrey Zhu

[ Previous Season ]

Auditions Results

I would like to thank everyone who took an interest in the Hart House Orchestra this Fall and put in the time and effort to prepare for an audition. It is a big ask and I appreciate what you did and the strain and even nerves that can result from such an endeavour. I cannot thank you enough for that.

While we did end up with a large ensemble of around 100 musicians, as required of the Mahler Symphony No. 3, I simply could not take everyone who auditioned. There are other ensembles at Hart House and in particular the Symphonic Band and Chamber Strings which also offer a means of participating in an ensemble which I can recommend to those who were ultimately not chosen as part of the orchestra. You can find those groups on their websites.

My hope is that you will again consider us in the future and I look forward to seeing and hearing you again.

Henry Janzen
Conductor and Music Director
Hart House Orchestra

Audition results for the 2023-24 season are posted in the PDFs below:

Summer Concert June 5, 2022 – Program Notes

Felix Mendelssohn: Overture “Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage”, op. 27

Mendelssohn’s concert overture Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage is a setting of two contrasting poems by Goethe, Meeresstille (Calm Sea) and Glückliche Fahrt (Prosperous Voyage). These two poems seem to have been very popular at the time, as they had already inspired Beethoven’s choral setting by the same name and Schubert’s lied Meeresstille). In fact, Mendelssohn was aware of Beethoven’s version and he acknowledged it by choosing the same key of D major for his overture.

Calm Sea is actually a rather dark poem: it describes a totally becalmed sea, which in the days of sail was a cause for alarm, as the ships couldn’t move without wind. Goethe even refers to a ‘fearful and deathly stillness’, depicted by Mendelssohn in a sombre adagio, only sluggishly agitated by contrapuntal undercurrents.

A solo flute makes the transition to Prosperous Voyage. The breeze raises, the mist clears and after a rush of orchestral excitement the vessel is underway to a heroic melody. There follow passages of plain interspersed with the nimble activity of the sailors, until fanfares and timpani cannonades announce that land is sighted. The voyage is over, and the overture ends with a contented sigh of relief.

Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, op 55  “Eroica

Composed between 1802 and 1804, Beethoven’s Third Symphony marked the beginning of the composer’s innovative “middle period”. With its scope, richness of ideas and dramatic character, it represents a turning point not only in Beethoven’s development as a composer, but also in the development of the symphony as a musical form itself.

The full title of the symphony, as it appears in Beethoven’s manuscript is Sinfonia eroica, composta per festeggiare il sovvenire d’un grand’uomo (Heroic symphony, composed to celebrate the memory of a great man). According to his pupil Ferdinand Ries, Beethoven originally named the symphony Buonaparte, and dedicated it to Napoleon Bonaparte, then First Consul of the French Republic – whom he reputedly greatly admired and in whom he saw the personification of the ideals of the French Revolution. When Beethoven learned the news that Napoleon had proclaimed himself emperor, he was so disgusted and disappointed that he tore the title page of the manuscript in half and later changed the title to Sinfonia eroica.

This is the legend of the Eroica; but like all legends, it has to be treated with a grain of salt. What is certain is that initially Beethoven did, indeed name the symphony Buonaparte and did dedicate it to Napoleon. However, modern research suggests a far more prosaic and pragmatic reason for the symphony’s initial association with Napoleon, and its subsequent dissociation with him. In 1803, the year he started to work on the symphony, Beethoven was contemplating either a tour or even a move to Paris, so it seemed a good idea to write a symphony honouring Bonaparte. When these plans didn’t materialize, Beethoven rededicated the work to Prince Lobkowitz, one of his most loyal admirers (who also payed very good money for it). Moreover, by that time Austria was at war with France, so obviously, the title Buonaparte had to go.

And if the French Revolution is not the inspiration for this work, what did move Beethoven to write it? And who is the hero mentioned in the new title? The true inspiration for the Eroica is personal: the symphony is the result of two crises, one artistic and one emotional, that Beethoven underwent in 1802. While enjoying an ever increasing success as a pianist and as a composer. Beethoven came to the gradual realization that he had reached the limits of what he could achieve by adhering strictly to the path of Haydn and Mozart, and he was searching for new solutions. Unfortunately, paralleling his artistic success, Beethoven’s hearing was continuously deteriorating. In the spring of 1802, on the advice of his physicians, he decided to give his hearing a rest by retiring to the quiet village of Heiligenstadt on the outskirts of Vienna. However, his hearing did not improve and by October he was in a deep emotional crisis and felt compelled to draft a testament, the famous Heiligenstadt Testament, discovered among his papers after his death. In the preamble, Beethoven describes in an anguished language his illness and his despondency. He then goes on to say that he contemplated suicide, but that his art prevented him from taking this course. Both crises, however, resulted in a sort of catharsis, and immediately following Heiligenstadt Beethoven started to work again with renewed vigour and in a novel, daring style. The frontispiece of this new phase in his artistic development is the Eroica. The symphony becomes an allegory of Beethoven’s own heroic struggle against blind fate, and his ultimate victory – the hero alluded in the symphony’s title is Beethoven himself. The Eroica is the first musical composition that is centered on the composer’s own personal experience and that makes it also the first Romantic symphony.

Musically speaking, what makes Eroica such a revolutionary work is its scope and complexity. The first movement is in the traditional sonata form, however Beethoven pushes the envelope from the get-go, by doing away with the slow introduction. The movement starts with a big bang: two chords in the home tonality of E-flat, which are immediately broken to form a noble, heroic subject. Harmonic tension appears very early on with a dark chromatic note in the fifth bar of the melody. Another innovations is the vey expansive and dramatic development section, which features a couple of climaxes, as well as new thematic material.

The second movement is entitled Marcia funebre (Funeral march) and it is the first time that a movement with a programmatic character is incorporated into a symphony. The traditional Minuet is replaced by an exuberant Scherzo, with Trio section featuring three horns.

The last movement is a set of variations. In yet another break with tradition, the theme isn’t explicitly stated until the third variation. The theme of the movement is one that Beethoven used in a series of earlier works, most notably the ballet music The Creatures of Prometheus Op. 43. In the Greek mythology Prometheus is the hero that stole the fire from the Gods and brought it to mankind. Therefore the symphony may be an allegory of Prometheus, and by extension, and allegory of the struggle of the human spirit against preordained, unjust order and blind fate. Such an interpretation would also fit with Beethoven’s admiration of the ideas of the French Revolution. Most importantly, Beethoven uses the symbol of Prometheus to transcend his own personal struggle and to elevate it to a more general level.. 

Joseph Nachman